News aus dem Teilprojekt B05


New article in "The China Quarterly"

Dr. Armin Müller, postdoctoral researcher in the project B05: "Inclusion and Benefit Dynamics in the Chinese Welfare Regime", wrote an article for "The China Quarterly" published online by Cambridge University Press.

The article "Cooperation Between Colleges and Companies: Vocational Education, Skill Mismatches and China's Turnover Problem" analyzes how market failure in skill formation is tackled in China from a collective action perspective. The state intervenes by providing vocational education in public middle schools and colleges, trying to provide companies with the skilled labor they need. However, much like in the Italian system, weak bureaucracy undermines the implementation of state regulation and the effective creation of vocational skills. Therefore, under the surface, skill formation is still dominated by market dynamics, and hence market failure. The article focuses on the role of collaborative projects between vocational colleges and private companies in mediating the dynamics of market failure. While such projects somewhat decrease the skill mismatches in the labor market, they are voluntary negotiated agreements that cannot tackle the underlying redistributive problems between companies and workers. Overall, the status quo drives the polarization of skills in the long run, thus reinforcing economic inequality.

Abstract

The Chinese government promotes cooperation between colleges and companies in vocational education to improve the supply of skilled workers and increase labour productivity. This study employs the concept of positive coordination – negotiations concurrently addressing productive and distributive questions – to analyse the advantages and limitations of voluntary cooperation embedded in networks. In terms of production, many projects focus on updating, narrowing and deepening curricula to lower the costs of initial training borne by companies and the risk of labour turnover. In terms of distribution, however, the deep and narrow curricula are at odds with students’ preference for general and transferable skills; and the mutual commitments of both companies and students are uncertain. The solutions provided by cooperation are partial and unstable. Overall, they reduce skill mismatches but cannot control turnover or overcome market failure, which undermines tertiary vocational education's contribution to labour productivity.

Armin Müller is a postdoctoral researcher at Constructor University, Bremen, Germany, and member of the project "Inclusion and Benefit Dynamics in the Chinese Welfare Regime" at the Collaborative Research Centre 1342 "Global Dynamics of Social Policy" funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). He formerly worked at Georg-August University Göttingen, Germany. His research focuses on social protection and the healthcare system in the People’s Republic of China, as well as vocational education and migration. He wrote his PhD about China’s rural health insurance at the University of Duisburg-Essen and spent one semester with the Transnational Studies Initiative at Harvard University studying transnational forms of social security.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. Yuegen Xiong sorrounded by CRC colleagues
Prof. Yuegen Xiong sorrounded by CRC colleagues
CRC 1342 Jour Fixe with Prof. Yuegen Xiong on January 10, 2024

The first event of the new year was a lecture by Prof. Yuegen Xiong from Peking University, China. As part of the CRC 1342 Jour Fixe he gave a talk on "Social Security Reform in Transitional China. Post-pandemic Challenges and Policy Reformulations" on January 10, 2024.

Yuegen Xiong described China’s socio-economic scenarios after the pandemic and analyzed its impact on the social security system. Following up on this, he elaborated the answers to the questions, how China adjusted its social policies to respond to the changing international atmosphere and domestic situations and whether the rural revitalization will be a new policy drive for social security system integration.

In his talk he gave an overview of the complex interdependencies and goal conflicts between various agendas in social and economic policy in urban and rural China. He particularly focused on policy change in health policy, health insurance and hospital payment; pension insurance and social assistance; and unemployment, economic recovery and the rural revitalization agenda. Furthermore, he elaborated on important aspects of public opinion and the anti-corruption campaign that are relevant for social policy. His insights are of considerable importance for contextualizing the findings of ongoing research on Chinese social policy.

Yuegen Xiong is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of the Centre for Social Policy Research (CSPR) at Peking University, China. He is the author of Needs, Reciprocity and Shared Function: Policy and Practice of Elderly Care in Urban China (Shanghai Renmin Press, 2008) and Social Policy: Theories and Analytical Approaches (Renmin University Press, 2009). Xiong graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong with a PhD in social welfare in 1998 and joined Peking University as a faculty after completing two-year post-doctoral research in the Department of Sociology. He was the British Academy KC Wong Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford during November 2002-September 2003, the Fellow at the Hanse Institute for Advanced Study (HWK), Delmenhorst, Germany during December 2003-February 2004, the JSPS Fellow at the University of Tokyo in October, 2005 and a visiting professor at Jacobs University Bremen during October-December, 2015 and visiting professor at the Center for Modern East Asian Studies, University of Göttingen, Germany in December, 2017. In the past years, he has published extensively in the field of social policy, comparative welfare regimes, social work, NGOs and civil society. He is the editorial member of Asian Social Work and Policy Review (Wiley), Asian Education and Development Studies (Emerald), the British Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies (UK) and International Journal of Community and Social Development (Sage). Prof. Xiong has been acting as the Co-Director of the Academic Committee, LSE-PKU Summer School Program since 2018.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. John Gibson, University of Waikato

John Gibson, Professor of Economics at the University of Waikato, New Zealand, visited the Collaborative Research Center 1342 on Thursday, October 26, 2023, for a Jour Fixe in the winter term 2023/24. In his talk "Big Data gone bad: Effects of measurement errors in popular DMSP night-time lights in empirical political economy," he spoke about the uses and abuses of night-time light satellite data in the social sciences to measure economic activity and assess local inequality.

Abstract:
Economists and other social science researchers increasingly use satellite-detected night-time lights, as one of the most popular “big data” sources. The most widely used series of night-time lights data are from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), which was initiated in the 1960s to observe clouds to aid US Air Force weather forecasts. Initial use of these data by social science researchers was as a proxy for economic activity at the national or aggregated regional level but increasingly these data are used to evaluate local impacts of interventions and to estimate local inequality. When measurement errors in these data were originally considered it was in a framework that just required that the errors were independent of errors in conventional economic statistics. However, more recent studies use DMSP data directly as a proxy and so the nature of their measurement error becomes important because under certain circumstances these errors could cause bias that distorts conclusions.

This talk provides two such examples: first, when estimating local inequality in China and the United States the level of inequality is understated and a misleading trend is introduced, because of spatially mean-reverting errors in the DMSP data. Second, in a difference-in-differences evaluation of the impact of a sanction on North Korea the sanction impact is understated due to mean-reverting errors and bottom-coding in the DMSP data. These errors reflect some of the inherent limitations of DMSP data. Where possible, applied economists and other social scientists should switch to using newer, more accurate, night-time lights data that were designed for research purposes, even if that means they have to work with shorter time-series.

See also: Popular Big Data on Night-Time Lights Underestimate Inequality

John Gibson is Professor of Economics at the University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. He also is the Editor-in-Chief of the Asian Development Review, and non-resident Visiting Fellow at the Asian Development Bank Institute in Tokyo. His research, inter alia, focuses on economic development and social inequality. Since receiving his PhD from Stanford University, he has worked in numerous countries including Cambodia, China, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, and Vietnam. 

Publications:

Using multi-source nighttime lights data to proxy for county-level economic activity in China from 2012 to 2019 (2022), with X Zhang, Remote Sensing.

Which night lights data should we use in economics, and where? (2021), with S Olivia, G Boe-Gibson, C Li, Journal of Development Economics.

Better night lights data, for longer (2021), Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics.

How important is selection? Experimental vs. non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration (2010), with D McKenzie, S Stillman, Journal of the European Economic Association.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Lehren ziehen im Autoritarismus

Dr. Armin Müller und Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink aus dem Teilprojekt B05 "Inklusions- und Leistungsdynamiken im chinesischen Wohlfahrtsregime" verfassten einen Beitrag, der in "Asian Politics & Policy" erschienen ist.

In dem Artikel "Lesson‐drawing under authoritarianism: Generosity and cost control in China's hospital payment reforms" (Asian Politics & Policy 2023) untersuchen Armin Müller und Tobias ten Brink (TP B05) jüngere Reformen der Krankenhausfinanzierung in chinesischen Städten vor ihrem historischen Hintergrund. Mittels Process Tracing rekonstruieren die Autoren zwei Reformwellen aus einer Lesson-Drawing Perspektive, wobei unterschiedliche Datenquellen (Expert*inneninterviews, Verwaltungsdokumente, akademische Studien und Zeitungsartikel) trianguliert werden.

Lokalregierungen waren die treibende Kraft hinter einer ersten Reformwelle in den 1990er Jahren. Sie wurde von vereinfachten Versionen internationaler Modelle dominiert, die keine starken prospektiven Vergütungskomponenten enthielten und somit die Interessen der Lokalregierungen und Krankenhäuser schützten. In einer zweiten Welle ab den 2000er Jahren ging der Impuls von der Zentralregierung aus, was zu einer verstärkten Übernahme von Synthesen internationaler Modelle und Anpassungen mit stärker prospektiven Vergütungskomponenten – und einer stärkeren Orientierung an den Interessen der Patienten – führte. Es wird festgestellt, dass ein erheblicher Druck von Seiten der Zentralregierung notwendig war, um die bürokratischen Eigeninteressen der Lokalregierungen an einer kostengünstigeren Reform zu minimieren.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: ttenbrink@constructor.university

In "Social Policy & Administration" haben 7 Teilprojekte des SFB 1342 Fallstudien sozialpolitischer Dynamiken im Globalen Süden vorgelegt. Deren Synthese zeigt: Das Konzept der kausalen Mechanismen ist gut geeignet, solche Entwicklungen zu analysieren.

Sieben Teilprojekte aus dem Projektbereich B des SFB 1342 haben eine Sonderausgabe von "Social Policy & Administration" veröffentlicht: Causal mechanisms in the analysis of transnational social policy dynamics: Evidence from the global south. Die zentrale Forschungsfrage, der die Autor*innen nachgehen, lautet: Welche kausalen Mechanismen können die transnationalen Dynamiken der Sozialpolitik im Globalen Süden erfassen?

Um Antworten auf diese Frage zu finden, präsentieren die Autor*innen vertiefende Fallstudien zu sozialpolitischen Dynamiken in verschiedenen Ländern und Regionen des Globalen Südens sowie in unterschiedlichen sozialpolitischen Feldern. Alle Beiträge konzentrieren sich auf das Zusammenspiel von nationalen und transnationalen Akteuren bei der Gestaltung von Sozialpolitik. (Die Beiträge dieser Special Issue sind unten aufgeführt.)

Die zentralen Erkenntnisse der Autorinnen und Autoren sind:

  • Erklärungen der Sozialpolitik im Globalen Süden bleiben unvollständig, wenn nicht auch transnationale Faktoren berücksichtigt werden
  • Dies bedeutet jedoch nicht, dass nationale Faktoren nicht mehr wichtig sind. Bei sozialpolitischen Entscheidungen sind nationale institutionelle Rahmenbedingungen und Akteure von zentraler Bedeutung
  • Die mechanismusbasierte Forschung kann das Zusammenspiel zwischen transnationalen und nationalen Akteuren und deren Einfluss auf die Gestaltung sozialpolitischer Ergebnisse plausibel nachzeichnen. Die Artikel identifizieren eine Vielzahl von Kausalmechanismen, die dieses Zusammenspiel erfassen können
  • Das Ergebnis sozialpolitischer Entscheidungen ist komplex und kann oft nicht durch einen einzigen Mechanismus erklärt werden. Die Untersuchung der Kombination und des möglichen Zusammenspiels mehrerer kausaler Mechanismen kann tiefer gehende Erklärungen liefern 
  • Das Konzept der Kausalmechanismen kann auch in vergleichenden Analysen angewendet werden
  • Mechanismen können induktiv in einem Fall aufgespürt und dann auf einen anderen Fall übertragen werden.


---

Johanna Kuhlmann & Tobias ten Brink (2021). Causal mechanisms in the analysis of transnational social policy dynamics: Evidence from the global south. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12725

Armin Müller (2021). Bureaucratic conflict between transnational actor coalitions: The diffusion of British national vocational qualifications to China. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12689 

Johanna Kuhlmann & Frank Nullmeier (2021). A mechanism‐based approach to the comparison of national pension systems in Vietnam and Sri Lanka. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12691 

Kressen Thyen & Roy Karadag (2021). Between affordable welfare and affordable food: Internationalized food subsidy reforms in Egypt and Tunisia. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12710

Monika Ewa Kaminska, Ertila Druga, Liva Stupele & Ante Malinar (2021). Changing the healthcare financing paradigm: Domestic actors and international organizations in the agenda setting for diffusion of social health insurance in post‐communist Central and Eastern Europe. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12724

Gulnaz Isabekova & Heiko Pleines (2021). Integrating development aid into social policy: Lessons on cooperation and its challenges learned from the example of health care in Kyrgyzstan. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12669 

Anna Safuta (2021). When policy entrepreneurs fail: Explaining the failure of long‐term care reforms in Poland. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12714

Jakob Henninger & Friederike Römer (2021). Choose your battles: How civil society organisations choose context‐specific goals and activities to fight for immigrant welfare rights in Malaysia and Argentina. Social Policy & Administration. https://doi.org/10.1111/spol.12721


Kontakt:
Dr. Johanna Kuhlmann
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-58574
E-Mail: johanna.kuhlmann@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: ttenbrink@constructor.university

B05-Mitglied Tao Liu hat ein Paper mitverfasst und veröffentlicht, in dem es heißt, dass die Sozialpolitik in China zum ersten Mal als Hauptakteur bei der Bewältigung der negativen Folgen einer Pandemie fungiert hat.

Tao Liu verfasste den Artikel "Social Policy Responses to the Covid-19 Crisis in China in 2020" gemeinsam mit seinen chinesischen Kollegen Quan Lu, Zehao Cai und Bin Chen. Er wurde Open Access im International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health veröffentlicht.

Der Artikel konzentriert sich darauf, wie die chinesische Sozialpolitik bis Juni 2020 auf die COVID-19-Krise reagiert hat. "Die Brisanz und Schwere der Pandemiekrise und ihre unvorhersehbaren sowie astronomischen sozialen Kosten haben im chinesischen Fall das Modell 'Big Government' mit massiven staatlichen Eingriffen in Gesellschaft und Wirtschaft gestärkt", stellen Tao Liu und seine Co-Autoren fest. Die Krise "hat die hypernormale und in einigen Fällen landesweite und groß angelegte extralegale Interventionspolitik weiter legitimiert". Um soziales Leid zu lindern und politische Stabilität zu gewährleisten, wurden verschiedene Arten von sozialpolitischen Programmen kombiniert, darunter Sozialversicherung und Sozialhilfe. "Zum ersten Mal hat die Sozialpolitik in China als Hauptakteur bei der Bewältigung der negativen Folgen einer Pandemie fungiert", schlussfolgern die Autoren.

Die Autoren konstatieren, dass China einen hohen Aufwand betreibt, um die Krise zu bewältigen. Dennoch üben sie Kritik. So seien beispielsweise weniger als die Hälfte der städtischen Arbeitsbevölkerung gegen Arbeitslosigkeit versichert. Darüber hinaus seien die ausgezahlten Beträge gering trotz eines über die Jahre angesammelten Überschusses von mittlerweile 82 Milliarden US-Dollar. Im Bereich Sozialhilfe hatten viele binnenmigrantische Arbeitskräfte Probleme, sich zu registrieren, weil sie nicht umgehend in ihre Heimatstädte reisen konnten.

Das vollständige Paper kann hier kostenlos gelesen und heruntergeladen werden.


Kontakt:
Prof. Dr. Tao Liu
Das Autorenteam identifiziert drei kausale Mechanismen, die in China zur Herausbildung beitragsfinanzierter Sozialversicherungssysteme geführt haben.

Seit Beginn der Reform- und Öffnungspolitik hat sich die soziale Sicherung für städtische Arbeitnehmer in der Volksrepublik China massiv verändert. Vor den 1980er-Jahren waren staatseigene Unternehmen für den Schutz der Arbeitnehmer vor sozialen Risiken wie Alter, Unfall und Krankheit verantwortlich. Heute sind diese drei Bereiche als beitragsfinanzierte Sozialversicherungssysteme organisiert, mit chinesischen Besonderheiten.

In ihrem Beitrag "Causal mechanisms in the making of China‘s social insurance system: Policy experimentation, topleader intervention, and elite cooperation" arbeiten Tobias ten Brink, Armin Müller und Tao Liu die kausalen Mechanismen herausgearbeitet, die in den 1990er- und frühen 2000er-Jahren zur Einführung der Sicherungssysteme geführt haben. Sie identifizieren drei kausale Mechanismen: (neutrales und strategisches) Experimentieren, Interventionen von zentralen Führungspersonen sowie (konsensbasierte und erzwungene) Elitenkooperation. Darüber hinaus zeigen die srei Autoren, dass das Vorhandensein oder Fehlen von Komplementaritäten zwischen dem internationalen Umfeld und der inländischen Akteurskonstellation einen entscheidenden Einfluss darauf hatte, wie sich die Mechanismen in den Politikbereichen der städtischen Renten-, Kranken- und Arbeitsunfallversicherung auswirken.

"Causal mechanisms in the making of China‘s social insurance system: Policy experimentation, topleader intervention, and elite cooperation" ist die siebte Forschungsarbeit, die seit Oktober 2019 als Socium SFB 1342 Working Paper publiziert wurde.


Kontakt:
Prof. Dr. Tao Liu
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: ttenbrink@constructor.university

Müller traf sich zur Videokonferenz mit Evelyne Gebhardt, stellvertretende Vorsitzende der Delegation für die Beziehung zur VR China im Europäischen Parlament, und Tamara Anthony, Leiterin des ARD-Auslandsstudios in Peking.

Eine Aufzeichnung des Gesprächs ist auf Evelyne Gebhardts Facebookseite verfügbar.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. Zheng Gongcheng
Prof. Zheng Gongcheng
Zheng Gongcheng, Professor an der Renmin University und Vorsitzender der Chinesischen Gesellschaft für Sozialversicherungsforschung, präsentierte am SFB 1342 seine Sicht auf den Wandel von Chinas Sozialpolitik.

Zheng Gongcheng, Professor an der School of Labour and Human Resources der Renmin University und Vorsitzender der Chinesischen Gesellschaft für Sozialversicherungsforschung, gab bei einem Besuch des SFB 1342 einen Überblick über die Entwicklung chinesischer Sozialpolitik, insbesondere in den letzten 70 Jahren. Dabei ging er auch auf die aktuellen Herausforderungen ein, vor der die Kommunistische Partei Chinas bei der Reform des Sozialsystems steht.

Zheng wies daraufhin, dass China eine lange Tradition der sozialen Sicherung hat. Katastrophen- und Hinterbliebenenhilfe habe es schon vor über 2000 Jahren gegeben. Die Han-Dynastie habe sogar ein Altenpflegesystem betrieben.

Chinas moderne Sozialpolitik begann allerdings erst vor rund 70 Jahren. 1949 gab es aufgrund von Naturkatastrophen acht Millionen Binnenflüchtlinge, für die ein Nothilfesystem aufgebaut wurde. Zeitgleich lag die Arbeitslosenquote in den Städten bei 50 Prozent. Um die Verelendung der Betroffenen zu verhindern, wurde 1951 die Arbeitslosenversicherung in Chinas Städten eingeführt, jedoch nicht auf dem Land. Diese Unterscheidung blieb charakteristisch für Chinas Sozialpolitik: Auch die Krankenversicherung und Waisenhilfe, die in den 1950er Jahren eingeführt wurden, blieben auf die Städte begrenzt. Die Sozialleistungen wurden zudem nicht vom Zentralstaat getragen, sondern von den Volksbetrieben.
Mit dem Übergang von der Planwirtschaft zur chinesischen Variante das Kapitalismus änderte sich auch die Sozialpolitik Chinas grundlegend. Die Sozialleistungen sind mittlerweile zumindest teilweise beitragsfinanziert, und auch die ländliche Bevölkerung ist in die Systeme einbezogen. Laut Zheng sind derzeit 1,4 Milliarden Chinesinnen und Chinesen in den Sozialversicherungssystemen registriert. 1,35 Mrd. Menschen sind krankenversichert, 277 Millionen beziehen derzeit Rentenzahlungen und rund 5 Prozent der Gesamtbevölkerung erhält Sozialhilfe.

"Das System ist dennoch noch weit entfernt von Reife", sagte Zheng. "Das Ziel der Gleichheit und Gerechtigkeit ist noch nicht erreicht." Die finanzielle Basis der Sozialsysteme müsse verbreitert und die Pools, aus denen die Leistungen gezahlt werden, müssten vergrößert werden. Derzeit ist beispielsweise die Krankversicherung noch nicht national gepoolt, sondern auf Landkreisebene.

Für die Rentenversicherung ist die landesweite Finanzierung für 2021 geplant. Den größten Reformbedarf hat das Rentensystem jedoch in den Punkten Renteneintrittsalter und Mindestbeitragsdauer. Derzeit können chinesische Frauen mit Erreichen des 51. Lebensjahres und Männer mit Erreichen des 61. Lebensjahres ihre Rente beziehen, sofern sie 15 Jahre lang Beiträge gezahlt haben. Dass das Rentensystem mit diesen Kennzahlen nicht nachhaltig finanziert werden kann, liegt auf der Hand.

Die nötigen Reformen sind aber unbeliebt: In einer Online-Befragung lehnten 97 Prozent der Beschäftigten im Öffentlichen Dienst eine Reform des Rentensystems ab. Die Kommunistische Partei hat den Fahrplan mit den nötigen Reformschritten bereits ausgearbeitet und wird von diesem wohl kaum abweichen. Aber, so Zheng Gongcheng, die Partei hat erkannt, dass sie Aufwand betreiben muss, um die Bevölkerung von den nötigen Änderungen zu überzeugen.
Mit Blick auf die Zukunft sprach sich Zheng auch für die Einführung einer privaten Rentenversicherung aus als Ergänzung zur staatlichen Rente. Auch der Einführung privater Grundschulen bewertete er positiv. Die Unfall- und Arbeitslosenversicherung müsse ausgeweitet werden. Die größte Aufgabe werde aber die Einführung einer Pflegeversicherung. Chinas Bevölkerung altert rapide, und 60 Prozent der Familien haben lediglich ein Kind. Eine Versorgung pflegebedürftiger alter Menschen in den Familien wird in Zukunft in sehr vielen Fällen nicht möglich sein. China beobachtet deshalb besonders die Langzeitpflegesysteme in Deutschland und Japan sehr genau.

Zheng Gongcheng war mit einer Reihe von Kolleginnen und Kollegen von verschiedenen sozialwissenschaftlichen Forschungseinrichtungen nach Bremen gekommen. Im Anschluss an Zhengs Vortrag traf sich die chinesische Delegation mit den Mitgliedern des Teilprojektes B05, um über die die Renten-, Sozialhilfe- und Krankenversicherungsreform in China im Detail zu diskutieren. SFB-Mitglied Liu Tao erläuterte den chinesischen Gästen zudem aktuelle Entwicklungen des deutschen Sozialversicherungssystems.


Kontakt:
Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: ttenbrink@constructor.university

Tao Liu, Tobias ten Brink und Armin Müller stellten ihre Forschungarbeit auf einer internationalen Konferenz des Centre for Chinese Public Administration Research in Guangzhou vor.

Vom 24. bis 25. November 2018 nahmen die Mitglieder des Teilprojekts B05 an der "Poverty, Inequality and Social Policy International Conference 2018" in Guangzhou, China, teil. Das Centre for Chinese Public Administration Research an der Sun Yat-sen University organisierte die Konferenz mit Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftlern aus Singapur, Hongkong, Taiwan, dem chinesischen Festland, Korea, Australien, Deutschland und Großbritannien.

Prof. Tao Liu, Prof. Tobias ten Brink und Dr. Armin Müller präsentierten während der Konferenz. Müller bewertete die Wirksamkeit der Krankenversicherung bei der Prävention krankheitsbedingter Armut in China bei älteren Menschen, während Liu digitale Risiken definierte und ihre Auswirkungen auf soziale Sicherungssysteme diskutierte. Prof. ten Brink stellte den Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 vor, seine beiden Projektbereiche A und B und das Projekt B05. In der Einleitung erwähnte er auch, wie das chinesische Dibao (garantiertes Grundeinkommen) unterschiedliche Vorstellungen vom europäischen Wohlfahrts-Universalismus, von der Arbeit der Amerikaner und von der chinesischen Tradition des Pragmatismus und Regionalismus zusammengefasst hat. Das Projektteam B05 hatte auch ein internes Treffen in Guangzhou.


Kontakt:
Prof. Dr. Tao Liu
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: ttenbrink@constructor.university