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Hier finden Sie Neuigkeiten aus dem Sonderforschungsbereich "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik": Zusammenfassungen aktueller Forschungsergebnisse, Hinweise auf Veröffentlichungen, Ergebnisse von Veranstaltungen und weiteres aus den Teilprojekten.


Neuigkeiten über Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik

Der Sonderforschungsbereich "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik" ist jetzt auf Mastodon!

Weiterhin sind auch auf unserem X-Kanal die aktuellsten Neuigkeiten rund um den SFB 1342 zu finden.

Darüber hinaus empfehlen wir den Blog Social Policy Worldwide des SOCIUM Forschungszentrums für soziale Ungleichheit und Sozialpolitik an der Universität Bremen.


Kontakt:
Dr. Maximilian Hohmann
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-57058
E-Mail: hohmann@uni-bremen.de

Projekt B04 (2022-2025)

Friederike Römer, Jakob Henninger und Mara Junge freuen sich, die Veröffentlichung der neuen Projekt-Website bekannt zu geben.

Die Website "The Immigrant Social Rights Project (ImmigSR)" bietet ein umfangreiches Informationsangebot, welches die neueste Version des Datensatzes, detaillierte Erläuterungen zur Konzeptualisierung und Methodologie, umfassende Informationen zur Länder- und Benefitabdeckung sowie Updates hinsichtlich Erweiterungen des Datensatzes zur Verfügung stellt.

Unsere Website wurde entwickelt, um Forscher:innen, Wissenschaftler:innen und interessierten Personen einen einfachen Zugang zu relevanten Informationen zu ermöglichen.
 
Wir laden ein, unsere neue Website unter https://www.socialpolicydynamics.de/projekte/projektbereich-b-transregionale-entwicklungsdynamiken/teilprojekt-b04-2022-25-/immigsr zu besuchen und mehr über unsere Arbeit zu erfahren.


Kontakt:
Dr. Jakob Henninger
DeZIM e.V.
Mauerstraße 76
10117 Berlin
E-Mail: jakob.henninger@uni-bremen.de

Mara Junge
DeZIM e.V.
Mauerstraße 76
10117 Berlin
E-Mail: junge@dezim-institut.de

Dr. Friederike Römer
DeZIM e.V.
Mauerstraße 76
10117 Berlin
E-Mail: roemer@dezim-institut.de

Prof. Lucia Coppolaro (University of Padova, Italy)
Prof. Lucia Coppolaro (University of Padova, Italy)
Jour Fixe with Prof. Lucia Coppolaro on January 31

The controversy between free trade and labor standards was the central field of tension in Lucia Coppolaro’s Jour Fixe lecture on Wednesday, January 31. In her presentation she addressed the role of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Prof. Coppolaro gave a historical overview of the interplay between trade liberalization on the one hand and social welfare on the other hand.

The central argument of Prof. Lucia Coppolaro’s presentation was the predominant role that globalization played in the tension between labor standards and free trade, in more general terms, between social policy and trade policy. Using an historical perspective reaching from the establishment of the GATT agreement in 1948 to the end of the 20th century, she explained that the processes summarized under the term globalization were the initial driving forces behind the discussion concerning social clauses. But apart from being the enabling factor that made labor standards part of a multilateral debate, globalization was also the reason that social clauses had not been included in the GATT regulations, neither in the WTO’s agenda and continue without strong recognition by the latter until today. Free trade, different to what has been proclaimed, was not a transmitter of social welfare that equally successfully trading countries would increase their spending on. Labor standards, whenever debated, served as a possibility to support protectionist agendas of wealthy countries such as the US towards so-called developing countries marginalized by the GATT and WTO later on.  

Abstract: The interplay between trade liberalization—a cornerstone of globalization—and social welfare constitutes a pivotal and contentious subject in contemporary political discourse. This controversy has surrounded the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its antecedent, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), since 1947, both of which have played important roles in promoting trade liberalization. Central to this debate is the connection between free trade and labor standards, specifically the proposition of integrating a social clause within trade liberalization agreements. The discourse has ebbed and flowed in tandem with the globalization wave. Initially broached in 1947, the topic lay dormant until the late 1960s, a period when trade liberalization, chiefly orchestrated by Western nations with comparable policies and labor standards, went unchallenged. The dynamic shifted in the 1970s as nations with lower wages and labor standards entered the global market, propelling the issue to prominence in Geneva. With the ascent of new economies capable of competing in developed markets, the discourse over the interrelation of free trade and labor standards acquired a global dimension and became a focal point within the GATT framework. Despite heightened discussions in the mid-1990s, little progress was made on the social clause, mainly due to the resistance from emerging economies that had accrued substantial negotiation leverage in Geneva. The emergence of global economic integration in the 1970s underscored the disparities between competing nations at varying developmental stages, revealing the complexities of the trade-labor nexus. Concurrently, the burgeoning influence of emerging economies in global commerce altered the power dynamics within the GATT/WTO, effectively stalling the labor standards debate in Geneva.

Lucia Coppolaro is Associate Professor in International History at the Department of Political Science, Law and International Studies of the University of Padova, Italy. Her research is primarily focused on international economic institutions and international trade. She has published numerous articles on the EU trade policy and the evolution of trade liberalization under the auspices of GATT/WTO in journals, including Contemporary European History and The International History Review.


Kontakt:
Fabienne Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaft / FB 08
Universitäts-Boulevard 13
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-58628
E-Mail: famuelle@uni-bremen.de

Der SFB 1342 nimmt bis zum 31. März 2024 Bewerbungen von Doktorandinnen und Doktoranden entgegen.

Die 13. NordWel Summer School "State, Society & Citizen - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Welfare State Development" wird im Haus der Wissenschaft in Bremen vom 19. bis 23. August 2024 stattfinden. Auf dieser Website sind der Call for Papers sowie weitere Informationen zur Summer School zu finden.


Kontakt:
Dr. Maximilian Hohmann
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-57058
E-Mail: hohmann@uni-bremen.de

Dr. Irina Wiegand
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-58508
E-Mail: irina.wiegand@uni-bremen.de

Project "Pathways to Family Policy Universalism: Inclusiveness and Scope of Family Policies in Global Perspective"

Student Assistant with up to 30 hrs/month

Start date: April 1st 2024. The position is temporary, with the intention of longer-term employment.

The project is a part of the DFG-funded Collaborative Research Centre 1342 "Global Dynamics of Social Policy" and is directed by Prof. Drobnič. 

This project focuses on surveying the historical development of family policy measures in all countries worldwide and explaining their spread across national borders. The role of international women's movements and civil society organizations will also be considered. 


Tasks:

  • Database and literature research
  • Collecting statistical data from text documents
  • Editing previously collected data
  • Support in data analysis


Requirements:

  • Interest in social policy and/or macro-comparative data and research questions
  • Proficiency in English (other language skills are welcome)
  • Experience in literature research and/or document analysis
  • Independent, reliable, and structured working style
  • Knowledge of R (especially data management) or STATA is an advantage


Please send an application with a CV and a short letter of motivation electronically as a pdf attachment to drobnic@uni-bremen.de


Kontakt:
Prof. Sonja Drobnič
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-66360
E-Mail: sonja.drobnic@bigsss.uni-bremen.de

Dr. Jun-gi Heo, GwangJu Public Agency for Social Service (PASS), South Korea
Dr. Jun-gi Heo, GwangJu Public Agency for Social Service (PASS), South Korea
Jour Fixe with Jun-gi Heo on January 23, 2024

Dr. Jun-gi Heo, researcher at the GwangJu Public Agency for Social Service (PASS) in South Korea, gave a talk as part of the CRC 1342 Jour Fixe lecture series on Wednesday, January 23. Key questions were: What determines the progress of disability policy? How can social rights be strengthened within disability policy? Heo presented the two case studies of South Korea and Brazil.

Jun-gi presented a part of his Ph.D. dissertation whose guiding research questions are: 1) Is social rights expansion occurring in disability policy? How is the relationship between the social model and the previous medical model changing? 2) To what extent do policy ideas influence the formation of disability policy? Through which actor dynamics can this diffusion be explained? Using a theoretical framework combining policy diffusion with historical institutionalism, he explained the diffusion of the social rights for a disability policy to South Korea and Brazil.

In South Korea, it was the government that initiated the process of adopting ‘the First Comprehensive Plan for Disability Policy’ under the influence of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)’s call for long-term strategies and national action plans for disability policy. It was mainly guided by the government’s legitimacy-seeking motivation, whose leader, the president, wanted to demonstrate his deservingness of receiving the ‘Roosevelt International Disability Rights Award.’ Consequently, the contents of the comprehensive plan were mere extensions of existing disability policy, far from the social rights, which was the global social policy trend back then. However, after the establishment of the first plan, as the disability movement increasingly took part in the policy-making process, the idea of social rights that they learned from foreign countries began to shape disability policies. By contacting the presidential office, legislators, and electoral candidates, the disability movement groups tried to have their advocated ideas adopted. Although there were conflicts between existing institutions and internationally diffused ideas, revealed in the form of layering or conversion, consistent pressure from international organizations and domestic actors made the coupling of a formal plan and actual implementation of an idea possible. He added that although he hasn’t studied a Brazilian case in depth yet, similar diffusion dynamics were observed when Brazilian disability policy adopted the social rights by introducing Politica Nacional de Assistencia Social and the Unified Social Assistance System.

Jun-gi Heo is a researcher at the GwangJu Public Agency for Social Service (PASS), South Korea. His academic interests primarily focus on Korean disability policy. For his doctoral dissertation, he explored the formation and evolution of Korean disability policy by integrating policy diffusion and historical institutionalism. Driven by a commitment to inclusive research, he strives to infuse his work with the perspective of people with disabilities. This endeavor is particularly challenging yet personally significant for him as a blind individual. Consequently, he also delves into the study of disabled identity, welfare states, and social policy research from a disability perspective.


Kontakt:
Migyeong Yun
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-58637
E-Mail: migyeong@uni-bremen.de

New article in "The China Quarterly"

Dr. Armin Müller, postdoctoral researcher in the project B05: "Inclusion and Benefit Dynamics in the Chinese Welfare Regime", wrote an article for "The China Quarterly" published online by Cambridge University Press.

The article "Cooperation Between Colleges and Companies: Vocational Education, Skill Mismatches and China's Turnover Problem" analyzes how market failure in skill formation is tackled in China from a collective action perspective. The state intervenes by providing vocational education in public middle schools and colleges, trying to provide companies with the skilled labor they need. However, much like in the Italian system, weak bureaucracy undermines the implementation of state regulation and the effective creation of vocational skills. Therefore, under the surface, skill formation is still dominated by market dynamics, and hence market failure. The article focuses on the role of collaborative projects between vocational colleges and private companies in mediating the dynamics of market failure. While such projects somewhat decrease the skill mismatches in the labor market, they are voluntary negotiated agreements that cannot tackle the underlying redistributive problems between companies and workers. Overall, the status quo drives the polarization of skills in the long run, thus reinforcing economic inequality.

Abstract

The Chinese government promotes cooperation between colleges and companies in vocational education to improve the supply of skilled workers and increase labour productivity. This study employs the concept of positive coordination – negotiations concurrently addressing productive and distributive questions – to analyse the advantages and limitations of voluntary cooperation embedded in networks. In terms of production, many projects focus on updating, narrowing and deepening curricula to lower the costs of initial training borne by companies and the risk of labour turnover. In terms of distribution, however, the deep and narrow curricula are at odds with students’ preference for general and transferable skills; and the mutual commitments of both companies and students are uncertain. The solutions provided by cooperation are partial and unstable. Overall, they reduce skill mismatches but cannot control turnover or overcome market failure, which undermines tertiary vocational education's contribution to labour productivity.

Armin Müller is a postdoctoral researcher at Constructor University, Bremen, Germany, and member of the project "Inclusion and Benefit Dynamics in the Chinese Welfare Regime" at the Collaborative Research Centre 1342 "Global Dynamics of Social Policy" funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). He formerly worked at Georg-August University Göttingen, Germany. His research focuses on social protection and the healthcare system in the People’s Republic of China, as well as vocational education and migration. He wrote his PhD about China’s rural health insurance at the University of Duisburg-Essen and spent one semester with the Transnational Studies Initiative at Harvard University studying transnational forms of social security.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

"Global developments in health care systems"

The project "Global developments in health care systems" is looking for new student assistants (up to 37 hours/month).

At the University of Bremen, the following positions are available in the Collaborative Research Centre 1342's project "Global developments in health care systems":

Student Assistants with up to 37 hrs/month

Start date: 01.03.2024 / as soon as possible. The position is temporary, but a longer-term employment is intended.

The project is a part of the DFG-funded Collaborative Research Centre 1342 "Global Dynamics of Social Policy" and is directed by Prof. Dr. Heinz Rothgang, Prof. Dr. Sebastian Haunss and Dr. Lorraine Frisina Doetter.

The aim of the project is to map the historical development of the inclusiveness and scope of benefits of health care systems worldwide. In doing so, we analyse and annotate documents of health care legislation. Based on the manual analysis we are creating a training data set to fine-tune AI language models to support data collection in this field on different levels of text classification.

Tasks: 

  • Database and literature research
  • Annotating of legal documents
  • Supporting on administrative tasks

 

Requirements:

  • Enrolled in a German University at least until July 2024
  • Excellent command of English
  • Experience in qualitative text analysis
  • Independent, reliable and organised working style
  • Interest in global social policy / health policy legislation

 

Desirable:

  • Experience with reference management software, especially Zotero
  • Experience in coding of text documents

 

Deadline for application: 26.01.2024 (afterwards, rolling basis until positions are filled.)

Please send applications with CV and short letter of motivation stating expected graduation date to Alexander Polte (alexander.polte@uni-bremen.de).


Kontakt:
Alexander Polte
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 218-57063
E-Mail: alexander.polte@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Yuegen Xiong sorrounded by CRC colleagues
Prof. Yuegen Xiong sorrounded by CRC colleagues
CRC 1342 Jour Fixe with Prof. Yuegen Xiong on January 10, 2024

The first event of the new year was a lecture by Prof. Yuegen Xiong from Peking University, China. As part of the CRC 1342 Jour Fixe he gave a talk on "Social Security Reform in Transitional China. Post-pandemic Challenges and Policy Reformulations" on January 10, 2024.

Yuegen Xiong described China’s socio-economic scenarios after the pandemic and analyzed its impact on the social security system. Following up on this, he elaborated the answers to the questions, how China adjusted its social policies to respond to the changing international atmosphere and domestic situations and whether the rural revitalization will be a new policy drive for social security system integration.

In his talk he gave an overview of the complex interdependencies and goal conflicts between various agendas in social and economic policy in urban and rural China. He particularly focused on policy change in health policy, health insurance and hospital payment; pension insurance and social assistance; and unemployment, economic recovery and the rural revitalization agenda. Furthermore, he elaborated on important aspects of public opinion and the anti-corruption campaign that are relevant for social policy. His insights are of considerable importance for contextualizing the findings of ongoing research on Chinese social policy.

Yuegen Xiong is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of the Centre for Social Policy Research (CSPR) at Peking University, China. He is the author of Needs, Reciprocity and Shared Function: Policy and Practice of Elderly Care in Urban China (Shanghai Renmin Press, 2008) and Social Policy: Theories and Analytical Approaches (Renmin University Press, 2009). Xiong graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong with a PhD in social welfare in 1998 and joined Peking University as a faculty after completing two-year post-doctoral research in the Department of Sociology. He was the British Academy KC Wong Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford during November 2002-September 2003, the Fellow at the Hanse Institute for Advanced Study (HWK), Delmenhorst, Germany during December 2003-February 2004, the JSPS Fellow at the University of Tokyo in October, 2005 and a visiting professor at Jacobs University Bremen during October-December, 2015 and visiting professor at the Center for Modern East Asian Studies, University of Göttingen, Germany in December, 2017. In the past years, he has published extensively in the field of social policy, comparative welfare regimes, social work, NGOs and civil society. He is the editorial member of Asian Social Work and Policy Review (Wiley), Asian Education and Development Studies (Emerald), the British Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies (UK) and International Journal of Community and Social Development (Sage). Prof. Xiong has been acting as the Co-Director of the Academic Committee, LSE-PKU Summer School Program since 2018.


Kontakt:
Dr. Armin Müller
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik, Research IV und China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Tel.: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: armmueller@constructor.university

On Wednesday, December 13, Gabriella Skitalinska successfully defended her PhD thesis titled "Learning to Improve Arguments: Automated Claim Quality Assessment and Optimization".

Being a member of both the former A01, now INF project and working in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP), Gabriella obtained her PhD from the Faculty of Mathematics/Computer Science (FB 03) with a "summa cum laude". In her research, Gabriella looked at the possibilities to automatically assess argument quality and recommend improvements which may inform downstream applications like writing assistants.

On Wednesday, December 13, Gabriella Skitalinska successfully defended her PhD thesis titled "Learning to Improve Arguments: Automated Claim Quality Assessment and Optimization". In her thesis, she explores the following research question: What makes a good argument and how can we computationally model this knowledge to develop tools supporting individuals in improving their arguments? To do so, she suggests using human revisions of argumentative texts as a basis to understand and model quality characteristics of arguments. In her first paper (Skitalinskaya and Wachmsuth (2023)), she summarized the main challenges of performing argument quality assessments using revision-based corpora covering issues related to the representativeness and reliability of data, topical bias in revision behaviors, appropriate model complexities and architectures, and the need for context when judging argumentative text. As part of her second paper (Skitalinskaya et al. (2021)), she describes how revision histories of argumentative texts can be used to analyze and compare the quality of argumentative texts. Finally, as part of the third paper (Skitalinskaya et al. (2023)), she works towards not only being able to automatically assess but also to optimize argumentative text. Here, she presents an approach that generates multiple candidate optimizations of an argumentative text and then identifies the best one using quality-based reranking.

Beyond her research, Gabriella was actively involved in co-creating WeSIS right from the beginning of the CRC, and took responsibility for implementing many of the systems nowadays features. Together with further A01 members she organized the co-creation process which led to the first prototype successfully reviewed for the second funding phase. Later, she continued both her research and her work on WeSIS in the INF project before joining the working group on NLP of Henning Wachsmuth at the Institute of Artificial Intelligence, Leibniz University Hannover.

For more results of Gabriella’s research, access her publications here.

Contact: Gabriella Skitalinska (g.skitalinska@ai.uni-hannover.de)


Kontakt:
Prof. Dr. Andreas Breiter
SFB 1342: Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
E-Mail: abreiter@ifib.de