Events

In a number of event formats, the CRC "Global Dynamics of Social Policy" presents and discusses new findings in social policy research. Usually these events are public.
The internal events of CRC 1342 are aimed to facilitate the exchange between the participating researchers and to promote their work on the research questions of their projects. Occasionally we report on the results of these internal events on the page "News".

29.02.2024 - 01.03.2024 Workshop

Generosity of Social Policies in Socialist and Post-socialist States. Authors' workshop

Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Place
Unicom-building
Room: 3.3380
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Time
9.00 am - 4.00 pm
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Internal Events
Semester
WiSe 2023/24

The four organizers (Ewa Kaminska-Visser, Tobias ten Brink, Andreas Heinrich and Heiko Pleines) are the editors of the edited volume "Generosity of Social Policies in Socialist and Post-socialist States". The volume is to be published with Palgrave, within the book series Global Dynamics of Social Policy.

The volume will map and compare socialist and post-socialist approaches to social policies, their implementation and outcomes, with the focus on how the generosity of social policies – understood as the combination of their inclusiveness and the scope of benefits they offer – has been conceptualised in different socialist and post-socialist national contexts, how these conceptualisations have shaped the content of social policies, and finally, how the content of social policies has actually been implemented. The book will cover the geographic areas of the (former) Soviet Union, Central and Eastern Europe, as well as selected countries in Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

The book will feature contributions from a number CRC projects (A03, A04, A05, B05, B09, B10 and B11), as well as research of colleagues from Leiden University, the University of Medical Sciences in Havana, Arkansas State University, and State University of New York.

The workshop's goal is to bring together the contributors in order to discuss the drafts of the chapters.

Place
Unicom-building
Room: 7.1020
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Time
noon - 2.00 pm
Organiser
Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Jour Fixe
Semester
SoSe 2024

Accurately measuring public perceptions of economic phenomena is complicated, but doing so is important for responsive policy-making. Survey measurement difficulties are particularly pronounced when it comes to economic inequality, which is an abstract and mathematically demanding concept, but perceptions of which have the potential to directly affect the desirability of redistributive policies. In this paper, we compare different ways to ask questions about perceived inequality, characterizing the costs and benefits of different approaches. In particular, we ask whether relatively complicated survey items result in high rates of “satisficing” and/or high rates of non-response, with consequences for survey quality. In a survey fielded to representative samples in Switzerland, Germany, and France, we ask respondents about income inequality in two different ways. First, respondents estimate household incomes at specified percentiles of the income distribution. Later in the survey, they estimate the incomes that qualify a household as rich or poor, respectively. We anticipate that because the percentile questions are relatively abstract, respondents may rely on their prototypes of the rich and the poor when answering, leading to similar answers to the two sets of questions. We also anticipate that because the percentile questions are more mathematically involved, we may see systematic non-response patterns. The results show that in all three countries, the 90th percentile, the 99th percentile, and the rich are seen as significantly different from each other in terms of household income. At the same time, we find significant rates of non-response and uninformative responses in the percentile questions (but not the questions about the rich/poor). We conclude that even apparently low levels of mathematical complexity in question wording can lead to non-response patterns that affect the representativeness of survey samples.

Kris-Stella Trump is a political scientist at Johns Hopkins University. A scholar of public opinion and political psychology, she primarily studies perceptions of deservingness, attitudes toward income inequality, and the politics of distribution. Her regional focus lies in the United States and Western Europe. Kris-Stella joined Johns Hopkins from the University of Memphis, and prior to that, she served as program director at the Social Science Research Council. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. She is Estonian by origin, and also lived in Sweden and the United Kingdom before moving to the United States. You can find out more at: https://www.kstrump.com

24.04.2024

CRC 1342 General Meeting

Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Place
Unicom building
Room: 3.3380
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Time
2.00 pm - 4.00 pm
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Internal Events
Semester
SoSe 2024

Agenda and further information will follow shortly.

Place
Unicom-building
Room: 7.1020
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Time
noon - 2.00 pm
Organiser
Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Jour Fixe
Semester
SoSe 2024

Nationalism is often presented as a purely political or cultural ideology whose proponents are uninterested in the minutiae of economic policy. In this talk, Marvin Suesse shows that nationalists do in fact think about the economy, and that this thinking matters once they hold power. Drawing on case studies from the American Revolution to the rise of China, he explains the varieties of economic nationalism, elucidates their origins, and analyses their effect on the development of the global economy. At the root of economic nationalism's appeal is its ability to capitalise upon economic inequality, both domestic and international. These inequalities are reinforced by political factors such as empire building, ethnic conflicts, and financial crises. This has given rise to powerful nationalist movements that have decisively shaped the global exchange of goods, people, and capital.
 
Marvin Suesse is Assistant Professor of Economics at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland and Director of Research at the Centre for Economics, Policy and History (CEPH). His work focuses on international political economy. He has previously published on the relationship between globalization and state formation in twentieth-century Africa (2023), market integration and financialization in Imperial Germany (2020) and regional disintegration in the former Soviet Union (2018). His first book, "The Nationalist Dilemma" was published by Cambridge University Press in 2023. He holds a PhD in economic history from Humboldt University Berlin.
07.06.2024

CRC 1342 Retreat

Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Place


Bremen
Time
9.00 am - 5.00 pm
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Internal Events
Semester
SoSe 2024

All members of the Collaborative Research Center 1342 are invited to the retreat.

Further information on the venue and agenda will follow shortly.

19.06.2024 Lecture

Immigrants and the Welfare State in Latin America

Dr. Sara Niedzwiecki (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Place
Unicom-building
Room: 7.1020
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Time
noon - 2.00 pm
Organiser
Sonderforschungsbereich 1342 "Globale Entwicklungsdynamiken von Sozialpolitik", Universität Bremen
Contact Person
Lecture Series
Jour Fixe
Semester
SoSe 2024

Sara Niedzwiecki is Associate Professor of Politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She studies social policy, subnational politics, and immigration in Latin America. Sara is the author of Uneven Social Policies: The Politics of Subnational Variation in Latin America (2018, Cambridge University Press), which was awarded LASA's Donna Lee Van Cott Book Award from The Political Institutions Section and the International Public Policy Association's IPPA Book Award. She also co-authored Measuring Regional Authority: A Postfunctionalist Theory of Governance (Oxford University Press, 2016). Sara has authored and co-authored articles in Comparative Political Studies, Electoral Studies, Latin American Politics and Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, Regional and Federal Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, International Political Science Review, among other peer-reviewed journals. During 2020-2021 academic year, Sara was a fellow at the University of Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies where she worked on a new project on social policy and immigration in South America. Website: saraniedzwiecki.com