Greta-Marleen Storath, Kristin Noack and Marlene Seiffarth
Greta-Marleen Storath, Kristin Noack and Marlene Seiffarth
As part of the "Science goes public!" event series, the PhD students Kristin Noack, Marlene Seiffarth and Greta-Marleen Storath presented their CRC project B07 in a pub in Bremen.

What happens to nonna in Italy, mormor in Sweden and Oma in Germany when they can no longer manage their everyday lives on their own? About 50 guests had come to the Bremen pub Gondi on Thursday evening to let Kristin Noack, Marlene Seiffarth and Greta-Marleen Storath explain to them the surprisingly different long-term care systems of the three countries.

While most of the guests were familiar with the German long-term care insurance (Pflegeversicherung), they learned over salt sticks, beer and wine that the Swedish long-term care is tax-funded and that the vast majority of elderly people prefer to be cared for by state nursing staff rather than by family members. The nursing profession has a fairly good reputation in Sweden and is better paid than in Germany, Storath reported. In Italy, on the other hand, people in need of long-term care are predominantly cared for by family members, mostly women, Seiffarth said. The families receive non-specific direct payments from the state, which in the middle and upper classes are used to pay migrant 24-hour nursing staff.

The guests were very focused while following the presentations and asked a number of questions, including the repercussions of the migration of nursing staff on their countries of origin, especially Eastern and South-Eastern Europe.

Kristin Noack, Marlene Seiffarth and Greta-Marleen Storath are working on their PhDs theses within the framework of the CRC project B07 "Transnational service provision in long-term care in Western and Eastern Europe", in which the countries Germany, Italy and Sweden as well as Poland, Romania and the Ukraine are examined and compared in case studies.

The "Science goes public!" event series takes place twice a year in Bremen and Bremerhaven and gives scientists the opportunity to present their work in a relaxed setting and to talk to citizens.


Contact:
Kristin Noack
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58604
E-Mail: knoack@uni-bremen.de

Marlene Seiffarth
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58600
E-Mail: m.seiffarth@uni-bremen.de

Greta-Marleen Storath
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-57068
E-Mail: gm.storath@uni-bremen.de