News from Project B05

The project B05 team in Dalian
The project B05 team in Dalian
The project B05 team was invited by the Chinese Association of Social Security to the 14th International Forum on Social Security "Social Security and State Governance".

In mid-September, the project B05 team was invited by the CAOSS (Chinese Association of Social Security) to the 14th International Forum on Social Security "Social Security and State Governance", the biggest conference in East Asia on social security and social policy. The conference was organized by ILO (International Labor Organization), FES (Friedrich Ebert Stiftung), KASP East Asia Research Committee, JASP's Section on Japan-East Asia Social Policy and CAOSS.

Tobias ten Brink presented the agenda of the CRC project as one of the keynote speeches, addressing the research of the CRC 1342 and the interest in China of project B05. The CRC project received great interest from both Chinese scholars and the international audience. Tao Liu from the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of Duisburg-Essen participated in the round table discussions on the future of social protection as one of the speakers. During the two-day conference, the B05 team had a meeting with the president of CAOSS, Prof. Zheng Gongcheng at Renmin University, on future co-work and research cooperation. Team member Dr. Armin Müller, research fellow Tong Tian and Yuxin Li of Duisburg-Essen University also attended. The conference in Dalian tightened CRC 1342’s relations with researchers from East Asia.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy, Research IV and China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: t.tenbrink@jacobs-university.de

Meeting at the Jacobs University Bremen
Meeting at the Jacobs University Bremen
Four scientists from the Centre for International Social Security Studies met with CRC 1342 members to exchange their views on pension reforms in China and Germany.

At the beginning of July a delegation from the Centre for International Social Security Studies (CISS) at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) came to visit the China Global Center at Jacobs University Bremen, and was warmly welcomed by the Dean of Jacobs University Bremen, Prof. Arvid Kappas. It was the first time Director Prof. Bingwen Zheng, General Secretary Prof. Lianquan Fang, associate Professor Chuanjun Qi and associate Professor Peng Guo visited Bremen.

During the meeting, Professor Tobias ten Brink delivered a presentation about the CRC 1342 project B05 "Dynamics of Chinese social policy. Interplay of national and international influences", which he and Professor Tao Liu at Duisburg-Essen University are directing. Tao Liu afterwards explained to the guests Germany’s Riester pension reform in detail. Peng Guo presented an update on the dynamics and reforms of Chinese old-age insurance. Dr. Armin Müller, Dr. Fei Wang, research fellow Tong Tian and Yuxin Li of Duisburg-Essen University also attended the meeting.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy, Research IV and China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: t.tenbrink@jacobs-university.de

Dr. Armin Müller
Dr. Armin Müller
As a teenager Armin Müller knew nothing about China, today he speaks Mandarin and is an expert on China's social security system. In an interview, he explains which impact state censorship has on his work and what money recycling machines are all about.

What would you have become if you hadn't become a scientist?

I wanted to be a musician. I played classical and electric guitar and in school I studied music as a major. I enjoyed it, but sometimes your wishes and reality do not match.

Obviously you noticed that in time and turned to science.

Yes, already as a teenager I was very interested in politics, economics and the connections between the two, especially with regard to the development of non-European societies. After school I looked around for something that was both practical and exciting for me personally. That's where political science came into play.

You're very interested in China. How did this happen?

When I was 16 or 17, I started reading oriental philosophy, and I found Taoism in particular quite exciting. I also realised relatively early on that China will have a strong political and economic position in the world by 2020. But I had to realize that I actually knew nothing about the country apart from the fact that a communist party reigns there. So I thought it would be interesting to take a closer look.

China is a rather inaccessible place for most people. Outside the capitals hardly anyone speaks English, the street signs only show Chinese characters... When did you first travel to China and how was that?

I was in China for the first time in 2003. But I had been learning Mandarin for a year and a half and was able to communicate. That made the country much more accessible to me. I have no idea what it's like to travel around China without speaking Chinese. All in all I imagine it to be quite difficult, although the most important signs etc. are now also translated into English. Sometimes, however, translation errors creep in, which can be quite funny when an ATM carries the label "Money Recycling Machine", for example.

You're fluent in Chinese now ...

Yes. Although I always have to refresh the language. I read Chinese texts every day, especially scientific ones. But that is quite a special vocabulary. So I use the time I'm on the train on my way to Jacobs University in the morning to practice my vocabulary.

China has undergone major changes since the turn of the millennium, state control and censorship are growing. How does this affect your work as a scientist?

At the beginning of the century there was a phase of opening: for some years it was relatively easy to conduct research on site. In recent years, things have tended to become more difficult again. The social climate has changed and many people are more cautious today than ten years ago. However, it also depends very much on what subject you are dealing with. Social policy is generally not a particularly sensitive issue.

Why did you specialise in social policy?

When my master's thesis was approaching, the new socio-political initiatives of China, some of which we are investigating in our CRC project, have just begun. My professor was also interested and so I started to deal with the rural health care system. The social security systems and political and administrative processes in China are quite complex and there is a lot to be done in this area.

Can you briefly outline your role in the project?

I am currently setting up an internal database to analyse how the various forms of social security have spread in recent years - especially since 2000, but also before that. Coordination among the various scientists is also an important task of mine because we are spread over two universities. And soon two PhD students wil join our team.

Dear Armin, thank you very much for the interview - we wish you and your whole team much success for your project!

 


Contact:
Dr. Armin Müller
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy, Research IV and China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 200-3473
E-Mail: arm.mueller@jacobs-university.de

Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
At a conference at Columbia University, Tobias ten Brink presented the aganda of the CRC project on China's social policy and discussed it with leading international experts.

Tobias ten Brink participated in the conference "Expanding Social Policy in China" at the China Center for Social Policy at Columbia University. In a roundtable discussion, ten Brink presented the CRC project "Dynamics of Chinese social policy. Interplay of national and international influences".

"Over the past fifteen years, the Chinese government has invested heavily in expanding the social system, and many citizens have gained access to social services for the first time," says Tobias ten Brink, who is deputy director of the Center for the Study of China & Globalization at Jacobs University Bremen. Although the level of Chinese social services is low compared to the West, it is higher than in other emerging countries such as India.

Ten Brink and Tao Liu from the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of Duisburg-Essen are jointly directing project B05. In addition to national factors such as economic growth, demography and internal migration, the scientists want to investigate how international factors influence national policy. “The Chinese government and experts have for decades been watching what is happening in other countries, including Europe, and have since then linked international role models with their own social policy traditions and created their own social security system,” says ten Brink.

"Via the presentation in New York, we were able adress parts of the US social policy community, especially those interested in China/East Asia, and channel their attention to our China project and the SFB as a whole," says ten Brink. "The SFB was received with great interest, especially as such extensive funding for social policy research currently seems impossible in the USA, according to the participants." The conference also served to deepen cooperation relations with researchers from the Anglo-Saxon region.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Tobias ten Brink
CRC 1342: Global Dynamics of Social Policy, Research IV and China Global Center
Campus Ring 1
28759 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 200-3382
E-Mail: t.tenbrink@jacobs-university.de